Gold Coast’s Last Lake Shore Drive In-Fill Gets Filled In

Sixteen months after we told you that the last non-park undeveloped space along North Lake Shore Drive between the Chicago River and Diversey Harbor is finally going to be filled in, we have achieved paperwork.

Plans for a new building to be erected at 59 East Banks Street were filed with the city yesterday.  The Booth Hansen design is an eight story building with 58 homes and 42 parking spaces.  It’s hard to tell from the diagrams in the city’s computers exactly what the building will look like, but it appears that it will lean substantially toward the historic character of the neighborhood, rather than the ugly brick mistake across the street.

  • Address: 59 East Banks Street
  • Address: 1321 North Ritchie Court
  • Address: 1316 North Lake Shore Drive
  • Net site area: 25,431 square feet
  • Floor Area Ratio: 5.081
  • Maximum height: 115 feet, one inch
  • Maximum residences: 58
  • Parking spaces: 42
  • Loading docks: one
  • Green roof alert: 7,383 square feet

Related Articles

Ten New Greystones Taking Shape in Near North It's not every day that downtown Chicago gets a new set of greystones.  So if you've had your fill of skyscrapers and cranes, head over to 111 West Ch...
Out With The Old, In With The New at 676 North LaSalle Last week we gave you an update on the demolition happening at 676 North LaSalle Street.  That's where a non-descript office building is being turned ...
With JCB’s On the Roof, 676 LaSalle Is Ready to Grow Up and Out The newest residential block going up in River North has tiny dozers crawling it like fleas on a Carolina hound dog. 676 North LaSalle under const...
The Latest Chicago Skyscraper Trend is Holes In the Roof (Left to right) Oculi at 1001 South State, The Marquee, and The Parker. 1001 and Marquee pix courtesy of Joe Zekas/YoChicago!) If you're the sort ...

Location: 59 East Banks Street, Gold Coast

Editor

Author: Editor

Editor founded the Chicago Architecture Blog in 2003, after a long career in journalism. He can be reached at chicagoarchitectureinfo@gmail.com.

Share This Post On

2 Comments

  1. That ugly brick abomination is the site of the former Palmer Mansion. That’s what we get for a private individual leaving something nice to the city of Chicago.

    Post a Reply
  2. Chicago does not respect its history. Sure there is an empty parking lot owned by Draper and Kramer that now
    has to be filled in with a building blocking the view of my modest apartment. If you have never seen the view of the lake
    from about the 10th floor you do not know the loss. I could see if Chicago needed more apartments but there is already
    a glut. This space should be preserved as a park or a row of the traditional 3 level mansions that would have lined Lake
    Shore drive originally.

    Post a Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Human Verification: In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.