Construction Update
Digging In For One Chicago’s Two New Towers

One Chicago (the buildings, not the futures exchange) is one of the projects we’re watching more closely these days.  Which is why we’re happy to report that progress is… progressing.

The city block across the street from Holy Name Cathedral has been denuded of the three brick buildings which once nestled together along the Dearborn Street side, and three surface parking lots have also been scraped away, leaving fertile ground for a pair of skyscrapers to grow.

One Chicago under construction (Courtesy of Joe Zekas/YoChicago!)
One Chicago under construction (Courtesy of Joe Zekas/YoChicago!)

In the photos above and below taken by Joe Zekas at YoChicago!, you can see construction crews hard at work getting things ready for what’s to come.  All the tools of the trade are on hand: digging machines, drilling machines, ice machines, whatever it takes to turn this under-utilized morsel of Chicago into a pair of residential towers.

And what a pair they will be: JDL Development’s One Chicago (the buildings, not the TV show fan club) will have 353 new residences in the main 76-story tower, and half a hundred more in the sibling 49-story tower.

One Chicago is now, thankfully, using the address 1 West Chicago Avenue in its marketing material.  In recent paperwork with the city, the development designed by Hartshorne Plunkard Architecture and Goettsch Partners was listed as “23 West Chicago Avenue,” which would have been a wasted opportunity.

For those of you concerned about reports that One Chicago will take up the entire block, fear not —  the Bella Luna pizzeria remains on the site, and in operation.  And even though it’s become “Food Network famous,” it’s still our go-to place for a cheap date after Saturday night mass.

Location: 1 West Chicago Avenue, Gold Coast

Editor

Author: Editor

Editor founded the Chicago Architecture Blog in 2003, after a long career in journalism. He can be reached at chicagoarchitectureinfo@gmail.com.

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2 Comments

  1. Finally something substantial-

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  2. Great article. I was wondering, what type of construction these towers were going to be: concrete & rebar reinforced or structural iron & concrete?

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