Key Link in Navy Pier Flyover Unchanged, But Still Improved

Six months ago we showed you a picture of the Navy Pier Flyover as it nearly, almost, just about connected to the Lake Shore Drive Bridge.  

Four months later, Streeterville Spy Joel popped by to check on the construction progress, and… oh, wait… well, hmm…

October 2019 Navy Pier Flyover construction (Courtesy of Streeterville Spy Joel)
October 2019 Navy Pier Flyover construction (Courtesy of Streeterville Spy Joel)

It’s exactly the same.

The ramp that puts the “flyover” in the Navy Pier Flyover has not yet landed on the bridge, where it will tunnel through the bridgehouses and continue southward.

July 2019 Navy Pier Flyover construction (Courtesy of Streeterville Spy Joel)
July 2019 Navy Pier Flyover construction (Courtesy of Streeterville Spy Joel)

That’s not to say that progress hasn’t been made.  It has.  In fact, you can take the Flyover from the north and still join the Lake Shore Drive Bridge.  But you have to do it from another, auxiliary, temporary attachment.  It’s not ideal, but it gets people from north to south until the project is fully complete.

CDOT finished attaching the first segment to the second segment around a month ago, linking Ohio Street Beach to the bridge, over DuSable Park.  The next part of the project is to do what Auckland and Cincinnati both did when their bridges became too narrow: They clamped platforms to the sides of the bridges to make them wider.

Because the engineering work for both projects was done by a Japanese firm, in both cities the bridge extensions became known as “Nippon clip-ons.”

Editor

Author: Editor

Editor founded the Chicago Architecture Blog in 2003, after a long career in journalism. He can be reached at chicagoarchitectureinfo@gmail.com.

Share This Post On

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Human Verification: In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.