City Preserving the Morton Salt Shed

For almost a hundred years, the Morton Salt complex at 1357 North Elston Avenue, has been welcoming commuters to downtown Chicago.  Now the city landmark with a lower case “l” is becoming an official City Landmark, with an uppercase “L.”  

The Morton Salt complex, before the eastern shed was torn down last year (via Apple Maps)
The Morton Salt complex, before the eastern shed was torn down last year (via Apple Maps)

This coming Thursday (March 4, 2021), the Commission on Chicago Landmarks will consider making the neighborhood icon a permanent part of the city’s landscape.  The move is related to the recently approved $30 million plan we told you about last month to convert the salt shed and other buildings into an entertainment venue.

Aside from the nostalgic painting of Sally Salt Spiller on the roof, why should this building become a landmark?  According to the Chicago Department of Planning and Development:

  • It is “one of the most iconic industrial sites along the North branch of the Chicago River.”
  • It “exemplifies the importance of salt production in Chicago’s history.”
  • “The complex is significant within the greater North Branch industrial corridor.”
  • It was designed by Graham, Anderson, Probst & White.  If you don’t know who they are, get thee to the Chicago Architecture Center right pronto.

Location: 1357 North Elston Avenue, Goose Island

Author: Editor

Editor founded the Chicago Architecture Blog in 2003, after a long career in journalism. He can be reached at chicagoarchitectureinfo@gmail.com.

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