Sedgwick at Locust Takes Shape
Apr18

Sedgwick at Locust Takes Shape

In a very busy corner of the old Cabrini-Green neighborhood, wedged between two new rental towers getting all the publicity, the condo development Sedgwick at Locust (367 West Locust Street) has reached its ultimate height of six floors, as workers from Maris Construction are making headway on the 45-unit building on the former site of Saint Dominic’s Church. The condominiums, from developer Belgravia Realty Group and designed...

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Sedgwick at Locust Gets Framed
Feb23

Sedgwick at Locust Gets Framed

You don’t need a tower crane to be cool, kids. Case in point: The Sedgwick at Locust, at 367 West Locust Street in the old Cabrini-Green neighborhood, is having some ironwork done with the help of a simple-yet-mighty rolling crane. Showing no signs of intimidation despite being wedged between tower cranes at NEXT and Niche 905, the big-wheeled Atlas machine is doing quite well setting beams upon beams. One of the joys in...

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Sedgwick at Locust Takes Root on Former St. Dominic’s Site
Nov30

Sedgwick at Locust Takes Root on Former St. Dominic’s Site

Construction crews have begun turning the site formerly home to Saint Dominic’s Catholic Church into the newest project by Belgravia Realty Group. Sedgwick at Locust (367 West Locust Street) will be a 6-story condo building with a 52-car parking garage, with electric charging. Designed by Sullivan Goulette & Wilson Architects, the new development will boast 44 units in total, consisting of 2-bed/2-bath units starting in the...

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Something New About to Rise at Saint Dominic’s
Oct21

Something New About to Rise at Saint Dominic’s

For some time we have monitored, chronicled, and lamented the demise of Saint Dominic’s Church at 357 West Locust Street in Cabrini Green.  The historic church was a key brick in the building of today’s Chicago. But like many bricks that get worn over the decades, it was tossed aside and abandoned. Now construction permits have been issued for the new condominium block that will rise on the corner of West Locust and North...

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Saint Dominic’s Church Ready For Last Rites
Aug07

Saint Dominic’s Church Ready For Last Rites

Back in July, our Kevin Mungons received divine dispensation to take one last look at the interior of Saint Dominic’s Church at 357 West Locust Street. The city of Chicago, as you recall, had just issued a demolition permit for the 110-year-old edifice. As sad as Kevin’s photos were, it’s even more disheartening to see this once mighty fortress reduced to the piles of rubble and scrap that now appear at the lot in...

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Awesome and Sad Pictures From the Last Minutes of St. Dominic’s in Cabrini Green
Jul06

Awesome and Sad Pictures From the Last Minutes of St. Dominic’s in Cabrini Green

The city of Chicago is putting the “wreck” in “rectory.”  A demolition permit has just been issued for what the city quaintly calls a “2 story masonry residence.”  We know it as the Saint Dominic’s Church rectory at 357 West Locust Street. The rectory and the church, itself, are being torn town to make way for a low-rise condominium building, part of a flurry of projects redeveloping Cabrini...

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Saint Dominic’s Doesn’t Have a Prayer, Will Be Demolished for Condos
May22

Saint Dominic’s Doesn’t Have a Prayer, Will Be Demolished for Condos

It’s official.  Saint Dominic’s Church is going condo. The church at 357 West Locust Street served the gritty heart of a gritty Chicago at its grittiest point in history.  It fed, clothed, and nurtured the city’s poorest in an era before municipal social services in a slum so wretched it was called “Little Hell.” Little Hell eventually shed that name and became Cabrini Green.  Now real estate developers...

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Plan to Replace Saint Dominic’s Church with Condominiums Revised
Mar31

Plan to Replace Saint Dominic’s Church with Condominiums Revised

We have long, and repeatedly, lamented the demise of Saint Dominic’s Church (357 West Locust Street) in the city’s Cabrini Green neighborhood.  The church was instrumental in taming a part of the city that grew up from the swamps as a lawless district of vice and poverty.  In an area so bad that for generations it was known as “Little Hell,” Saint Dominic’s was an oasis of faith, hope, and charity. Six...

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